Coronavirus

Find our latest news and guidance surrounding the Covid-19 crisis here.

X
Skip Content

Juliet Rosenfeld

Thirty years ago, I got depressed at university for no apparent reason. A therapist asked me to describe my feelings, which helped us identify what was going on. I realised I had been suffering psychologically since childhood, despite having loving parents and friends. That was the beginning of an enduring interest in understanding the darker side of our emotions.

I was a civil servant, then began a foundation course in psychotherapy at the Tavistock and Portman NHS trust, focusing on analysis. The latter changed my life and my sense of self, and I was ready to train.

I am still training, and always will be. As a therapist, the most important insight is gained through your own therapy. Formal training should only follow when you have worked out – more or less – who you are. Becoming a therapist never ends.


The United Kingdom Council for Psychotherapists can help you find an expert therapist near you.

If you are interested in training to become a therapist, then you can find out more about UKCP accredited trainings here.