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Millennial Mindset

Toddlers mental health is at risk from online content

June 14, 2019

By: Jenna Rachid

A new Barnardo’s report stated that Toddlers mental health is at risk, with many exposed to social media years before they should be.

According to the Telegraph, 60% of the charity’s frontline staff said they have seen children under five regularly using social media platforms such as YouTube.

One frontline worker said: ‘The children are parented via iPads and phones as it keeps them quiet.

‘Addiction to iPads resulting in the child having a meltdown and the parents believing the child has autism or learning needs when in fact it is lack of parental interaction.’

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Shocking figures link Domestic violence survivors and the onset of mental ill health

New research reveals that women who have been subjected to domestic violence are three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression, anxiety and other severe mental health conditions.

The study was one of the first in the UK to look at the relationship between domestic abuse and mental health, the Guardian reports.

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A third of millennials feel their parents are not able to stay safe online 

Up to a third of Millennials are worried about their parents being the victim of a scam, ‘due to a lack of technological knowledge’, the Mirror reports.

67% of the young respondents stated that they felt it was their duty to provide online support to older relatives. This can put a strain on relationships, 42% of millennials admitted that they avoid interacting with family if they think they need tech support.

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Do parents have a right to know the mental health state of their ‘adult’ children?

66% of students believe that a parent or guardian should be informed about their child’s mental health, only if the circumstances are ‘extreme’.

The Student Academic Experience Survey, conducted by Advance HE and the Higher Education Policy Institute, also found that 15% of students think parents or guardians should be informed ‘under any circumstances’.

‘Student wellbeing remains a huge concern… we have a very strong signal here in support of that change,’ said Alison Johns, Chief Executive of Advance HE in the Guardian.

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