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MILLENNIAL MINDSET: England footballer Danny Rose reveals he has had therapy for depression

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Publication date: June 8, 2018

England footballer Danny Rose reveals he has had therapy for depression

Footballer Danny Rose has opened up about his experiences with depression as he gears up for the start of the world cup.

In an interview earlier this week, the Independent reports Rose said: ‘It’s no secret that I’ve been through a testing time at Tottenham this season, which led to me seeing a psychologist and I was diagnosed with depression, which nobody knows about.’

‘I was getting very angry, very easily. I didn’t want to go into football, I didn’t want to do my rehab, I was snapping when I got home, friends were asking me to do things and I wouldn’t want to go out, and I would come home and go straight to bed.’

Rose said the diagnosis came after a lengthy knee injury put him out of action, which was the first in a number of personal issues including his uncle taking his own life, his mother being subjected to racist abuse and his brother being shot at in his family home.

Rose also revealed that before speaking publicly he had not talked about his mental health problems to anyone, not even to his parents.

‘You are the only people who know about a lot of this stuff – I haven’t told my mum or my dad, and they are probably going to be really angry reading this, but I’ve kept it to myself until now.’

‘I’ve been through a lot, and England has been my salvation. One million per cent.’

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Love Island comes under fire for lack of body image diversity

This week saw the return of Love Island, the show where singletons spend the summer in a villa looking for love.

However, the return of the hit show has sparked criticism due to the lack of body diversity among the contestants.

Many, including celebrities, have taken to Twitter to complain about the size of the slim and toned women on the show, with some pointing out that they do not represent ‘realistic body ideals’.


Whilst it’s mainly women who have taken to Twitter to vent their frustrations, Metro.co.uk senior lifestyle reporter Miranda Larbi points out that: ‘It’s not just women who need to see more body image diversity on Love Island.’

‘Yes, the women are slim but the blokes’ bodies are on another level. I’ve seen a lot of ripped torsos in my time but I’m yet to see six packs as well defined in real life as they seem to be on ITV at the moment. It’s as if they’ve all just wandered off the cover of Men’s Health (and even then, they’d give professional athletes a run for their money).’

In an opinion piece Larbi points out that while ‘unachievable body image is bad for everyone’, she worries what impact it will have on men in the future.

It’s predicted that one in 10 male gym goers could have Muscle Dysmorphia, an anxiety disorder which ‘causes someone to see themselves as small, despite being big and muscular.’

‘At some point, we’re going to have to address the pressures on men to look a certain way. Yes, women deserve to see more diversity and yes, eating disorders do mainly affect the female population (89% of anorexia sufferers are women, according to Beat),’ Larbi writes.

‘But if we allow images of ultra-bulky dudes to dominate our social, print and TV media, then we’re going to have a male-led mental and physical health disaster on our hands soon.’

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In case you missed it…

Cats can have a positive impact on mental wellbeing – Harriet Williamson, who is Metro lifestyle reporter at the Metro, credits her cats with getting her through some of her darkest days.

Why are we all so stressed? – For an ‘alternative’ look at why we are all more stressed ShortList  spoke to three accomplished people from very different back grounds.